Profanity : Social Behavior, Social Constructionism, Insult, Rudeness, Vulgarism, Cuss, Curse, Pejorative, Expletive, Oath, Blasphemy, Steven Pinker, Dysphemism, Euphemism

Edited by Lambert M. Surhone, Edited by Miriam T. Timpledon, Edited by Susan F. Marseken

Profanity : Social Behavior, Social Constructionism, Insult, Rudeness, Vulgarism, Cuss, Curse, Pejorative, Expletive, Oath, Blasphemy, Steven Pinker, Dysphemism, Euphemism

Edited by Lambert M. Surhone, Edited by Miriam T. Timpledon, Edited by Susan F. Marseken

High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! The original meaning of the adjective profane referred to items not belonging to the church, e.g. The fort is the oldest profane building in the town, but the local monastery is older, and is the oldest building, or besides designing churches, he also designed many profane buildings. As a result, profane and profanity has therefore come to describe a word, expression, gesture, or other social behavior which is socially constructed or interpreted as insulting, rudeness, vulgarism, desecrating, or showing disrespect.